Characterisation of the virulence complex of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (ANU-Humboldt Graduate School project) (Higher degree research)

Scanning electron microscope image of a malaria parasite-infected human erythrocyte
Scanning electron microscope image of a malaria parasite-infected human erythrocyte

Members

Supervisor

Partnerships

Kai Matuschewski and Alyssa Ingmundson at HU Berlin

The malaria parasite-infected human red blood cell cytoadheres to receptors on the endothelial cells in vital organs of its host by expressing virulence complex proteins on its host cell surface. These proteins traffic through parasite established organelles in the host cell, Maurer’s clefts.

In this project we will characterise the assembly and function of the individual virulence complex components in a cellular context. Techniques include generating transgenic P. falciparum cell lines, functional biochemical analytical assays and mutant characterisation by various advanced microscopy techniques.

This project is part of the Crossing Boundaries: Molecular Interactions in Malaria Graduate School.
Participants study at both ANU and the Humboldt University in Berlin, earning a dual degree. Find out more here.

Updated:  21 October 2017/Responsible Officer:  Director CAM/Page Contact:  CAM Web Admin